Reviews

Just in case you need to see what others think of the group before committing your hard-earned to a ticket, here are some reviews. Click on the reviews to expand them, and they will magically reveal themselves to you by the wonders of technology!


Broadway Baby


Written by Leila Battison
Published on Saturday, 13 August 2011
Performance reviewed: Gilded Balloon, Edinburgh Fringe - August 2011

Those of you of a sensitive disposition, what the f*ck are you doing here?

Last year Fascinating Aida went viral on the internet with their song ‘Cheap Flights’. These three marvellous women, Dillie Keane, Adele Anderson and Sarah-Louise Young, have taken the opportunity to bring a fantastic cabaret show of the same name to Edinburgh this August.

Sitting high up in the gallery of a packed theatre space, the audience below me showed predominantly grey hair. Having already heard some of Fascinating Aida’s work, and knowing what was to come, I worried for their sensibilities. But not long into ‘The Dogging Song’ (in Dillie’s own words, ‘look it up, but clear your search history afterwards’), my fears were swept aside as their matter-of-fact comic brilliance had the audience roaring with laughter at even the most throbbingly blue lyrics.

Flitting between genres, including a Bulgarian song cycle, a Reggae-influenced rap, and a wartime pep-tune, as well as some classic cabaret variety footwork and props (I’m talking bowler hats, umbrellas and showgirl fans) a night with Fascinating Aida is a feast for the eyes and the ears.

Interspersed with their wonderful songs is comfortable banter and a gentle showmanship, lulling you into a false sense of security which the next shocking number will shatter and stamp all over.

Having accumulated over 80 years of Fringe experience between them, these lewd ladies are grotesquely sexual and irresistibly alluring. The Fascinating Aida experience is one of those things you just can’t put into words. Just go, go and see how all that experience can make the perfect cabaret show.

- end -
Link to the original article

The Edinburgh Reporter


Written by Thomas Haywood
Published on Saturday, 13 August 2011
Performance reviewed: Gilded Balloon, Edinburgh Fringe - August 2011

Fascinating Aïda are 3 ladies who have a wry and often hilarious view of the world through song.

Dillie Keane, Adèle Anderson and Sara-Louise Young take you through subjects such as tax evasion, religion and cheap flights. The packed auditorium was a testament to how popular this trio are and was often in a state of mirth! There are some pretty racy songs so it is not for the faint-hearted! Dillie is responsible for some of that content; she has a very sharp wit and a great sense of the pulse of the audience.

Their song, Cheap Flights – an internet sensation- drew large rounds of applause as it took apart the myth that you can fly anywhere for 50p for once and all! Go see it, that is, if you can get a ticket before it’s too late!

- end -
Link to the original article

Fest magazine


Written by Marcus Kernohan
Published on Saturday, 13 August 2011
Performance reviewed: Gilded Balloon, Edinburgh Fringe - August 2011

Fascinating Aïda reckon that they have, cumulatively, some 80 years of Fringe experience between them - and yet the legendary cabaret trio’s leader, Dillie Keane, still seems faintly surprised by the cataclysm of applause that erupts as they step onto the boards to introduce their new show Cheap Flights to a packed house.

It is their first new show in several years, and Fascinating Aïda seem determined to prove early on that they’ve lost none of their edge in this, their 27th performing year. Acronymic opener ‘CUNTS’ (that’s Companies Using Nifty Taxation Systems) takes non-dom tax-dodgers to task in typically ruthless form, while old favourite ‘One True Religion’ superbly spears middle-class “metaphysical shopping sprees”.

Keane and her writing partner Adele Anderson are on fine form tonight, despite persistent technical difficulties, while new soprano Sarah-Louise Young showcases an admirably strong voice, with enough charm and swagger to perfectly fit the FA mould.

Fascinating Aïda have always revelled in incongruity, and Cheap Flights continues in that tradition: the sight of Keane rapping during ‘Down With The Kids’ is at once utterly surreal and oddly compelling, while the self-explanatory ‘Dogging’ plays remarkably well to a predominantly older audience. YouTube hit ‘Cheap Flights’—which, Anderson proudly notes, “has gone fungal”—goes down a storm, but that was always to be expected.

A number about taking an elderly relative to Dignitas is an awkward moment for the audience—though typically well-written, it’s nonetheless hard to laugh at euthanasia—but it’s an unusual misstep in a show packed with razor-sharp satirical songwriting.

- end -
Link to the original article

AllTheFestivals.com


Written by David Marren
Published on Wednesday, 10 August 2011
Performance reviewed: Gilded Balloon, Edinburgh Fringe - August 2011

Fringe stalwarts Fascinating Aida certainly know how to entertain an audience throughout the duration of this very fine show.  A trio consisting of fine performances by Adele Anderson, Sarah Louise Young and most particularly Dillie Keane they approach bleak themes captured in song that have their audience in raptures throughout. At the heart of this show is vaudeville via cabaret but its success stems from the strength of the material and the exceptional performances throughout. One thing that did strike me was that many in the audience were of advanced years and they summed remarkably au fait with songs about the unsavoury practice- and apparently the hobby that keeps Dillie’s marriage alive- dogging and were thoroughly enjoying them. In fact this show which embraces many risqué subjects and uses swear words liberally does not offend, feel unnecessary or overly forced, could teach a few of the young whippersnappers masquerading as alternative and cutting edge how it should be done. The fact the title song of the show features a chorus of very little other than ‘Feckity, feckity, feck, feck’ that is essential to the frustrations built up to in the verses sums up this show perfectly.

The aforementioned ‘Dogging Song’ and ‘Cheap Flights’ do provide the shows most riotous moments and are rapturously received. They are not alone as the whole show is consistent, coherent and cleverly constructed. Further highlights include a series of songs in Bulgarian folk song style. These barbed vignettes extend a roll call to include the likes of Cheryl Cole, Tony Blair and a totally topical London riots. Each one is carefully nuanced and perfectly executed. Likewise the rap number although slightly embarrassing is wittily incisive. Another number about boredom contains a brilliant rhyme between Justin Beiber and amoeba. The penultimate song which features Dillie alone at the piano has all the beautiful world weary melancholy of latterday Marianne Faithfull and indicates behind all the larking about there is a deeply serious talent.

The show that I attended was a total sell out and I believe they are packing them in nightly. As mentioned the audience on this night comprised an older set but I believe this act would also appeal greatly to a much younger audience. There is much here to recommend them as the subject matter they confront is totally contemporary even if the delivery is more traditional. I feel however the juxtaposition works and in the end becomes wholly irresistible.

- end -
Link to the original article

The Herald


Written by Colin Somerville
Published on Wednesday, 10 August 2011
Performance reviewed: Gilded Balloon, Edinburgh Fringe - August 2011

Les grand dames of Edinburgh Fringe cabaret comedy have still got it – the ability to give a voice to the disgruntlement of the middle class and middle aged.

Led by the indomitable Dilly Keane at the piano, the trio rail the unjust, and have a great David Cameron gag and an even better one about Cheryl Cole. Dilly jests that she is Beethoven light, where in fact she is more Victoria Wood dark, while Adele Anderson contributes her lofty intensity to their greatest hit and more. The title song Cheap Flights from this show has gone viral on You Tube, or fungal, as she so purposefully misinterprets it. Six million hits and counting, it is a natty tune that bears their satirical hallmark of quality.

- end -
Link to the original article

The Argus


Written by Mary Kalmus
Published on Monday, 17 October 2011
Performance reviewed: Theatre Royal Brighton - 16 October 2011

The appeal of this 28-year-old act was its ability, thanks largely to Dillie Keane’s diligence, to keep up with the times. From the first moment, when the brocade-wearing, harlem-panted trio took to the stage with an apt poke at the country’s financiers – or companies using nifty tax systems – to the last note of a song in praise of Brighton, this was pure, thought-provoking fun.

While old-timers Dillie and Adele Anderson were grateful to newcomer Sarah-Louise Young for bringing the average age of the group down, they also benefited from her for overlaying their mezzo and bass vocal notes with her flutey, fragrant soprano ones. Her appeal was at its height in her solo satirical look at alternative living – The One True Religion Is Me.

Dillie, meanwhile, was at her comedic best when performing the second song of the evening, the unutterably rude, You Tube hit Dogging – “We do it cos we’ve found that when people crowd around, it’s somehow more profound when you’re dogging”.

What set this group apart from other satirical cabaret acts was its sheer diversity of styles – a valiant attempt at beat-boxing and break dancing, a crack at Cabaret – “It doesn’t matter if you sing out of tune, so long as you’re German” – and finally, most brilliantly, the rousing and hilarious Gospel-style Jesus Saves, But Tesco Saves You More.

The Sunday evening house was packed to the rafters with punters and with laughter. They couldn’t have liked it more.

- end -
Link to the original article

Latest 7


Written by Andrew Kay
Published on Monday, 17 October 2011
Performance reviewed: Theatre Royal Brighton - 16 October 2011

Dilly Keane and team filled the theatre and filled our hearts with a show that proved once again that they are the queens of cabaret. From song one to the encore we sat with huge grins on our faces as they ripped through a set of satirical ditties that would make eve the most radical stand-ups look like pussy cats. Sharper by far than Frankie Boyle – and set to music! And that music is first class, quality compositions, arrangements, witty lyrical tricks, perfect scansion… and a liberal dollop of filth too, what’s not to love. Twenty eight years on the road and still drop dead brilliant, they have perfected the art of political satire, wrapped it in song, tied a huge glittery ribbon around it and called it entertainment. Evenings at the theatre do not come any better than this.

- end -
Link to the original article

Page 7 of 7    ‹ First  < 5 6 7